• manufacturer/type:

Werkstätte Hagenauer Wien

• year:

1930-1950

• material:
cast bronze

• measurements:

10,5 cm high x 9,5 cm length x 6 cm width

• condition:

Beautiful original condition, some very minor user marks.

• background:

Werkstätte Hagenauer Wien (wHw) was a family business in Vienna that produced fine, handcrafted objects for decoration and use.

Carl Hagenauer (1872-1928) founded the Werkstätte Hagenauer Wien in 1898. His workshop produced his own designs and those of other artists such as Josef Hoffmann and Otto Prutscher. Hagenauer’s sons Karl (1898-1956) and Franz (1906 - 1986) both became renowned designers.

• literature:
Christopher Long
The Werkstätte Hagenauer: Design and Marketing in Vienna between the World Wars

Studies in the Decorative Arts

Vol. 10, No. 2 (SPRING-SUMMER 2003), pp. 2-20



€195,–    CONTACT

architect Karl Hagenauer for Werkstätte Hagenauer Wien, bronze candlestick

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aesthetic value in material culture

Karl Hagenauer was an influential designer in the Art Deco style. He enrolled at the Vienna School of Applied Arts at age eleven. He studied with Josef Hoffmann and Oskar Strnad and created designs for the Wiener Werkstätte art collective. After wartime service in the infantry, he resumed his training and qualified as an architect. He joined the family business in 1919 and soon took on leadership in both design and management. He designed the company’s trademark encircled "wHw" and registered it in 1927.

Karl Hagenauer's work was presented at the “Exposition des Arts Décoratifs” in Paris in 1925, where he won a bronze and a silver medal. While Karl Hagenauer was the principal designer of everyday objects (and some sculptures), his younger brother Franz specialized in sculpture.

In 1947 Hagenauer designs were presented in the exhibition ‘100 useful objects of fine design 1947: available
under $100’ organized by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). This exhibition was installed by Mies van der Rohe.